Theatre in Wales

Plays and dance productions in Wales since 1982...

Adam Strickson

 

We have information on one play by Adam Strickson . Click on the play name to access any reviews in out archive. Click on the company's name to read their details on this web site

 

Bwrw Hen Wragedd a Ffyn First presented in 2006
by Llwyfan Gogledd Cymru

synopsis:
Imagine . . .  It’s twenty years in the future, 2026.  The UK is involved in an endless on-off war with  Middle Eastern states.  Here, security is tight and everything that is said may be heard,  everything that is done may be filmed.  Britain has begun to disintegrate under its own contradictions and the borders being  closed down . . .     'Raining Old Women and Sticks' explores racial and linguistic identity and question notions  of ‘self’ in an ever changing Britain.  The production brings together different communities,  by fusing Welsh myth and history with Asian stories and the landscapes of Snowdonia with  inner city Bradford.       The English, Mirpuri and Welsh language will be used in performance to weave together  three different cultures, to delight, illuminate and challenge audiences from the city of  Bradford and the towns of Wales.    Artistic Director, Iain Bloomfield commented:     "This play is home-grown, inspired by the many cultures who live in Bradford and  the perceptions the outside world has of this city, it explores what we mean when we use  the term “British”.  This play challenges us, looking at what both divides and unites  communities.  

'Raining Old Women and Sticks' dares to engage with political realities and explores  possible futures." Iain continued: “The play raises many questions; What does it mean to  be non white and English? Does a sense of 'British-ness' exist?    Historically, Britain has always been a multi languaged Island, “Raining Old Women and  Sticks” delves into language as a cultural reference point and asks: if certain words are  untranslatable from one language to another, are thoughts? And if we lose our mother  tongue do we also lose a way of thinking?”    Five actors (Welsh and British Asian), with the help of video projections, masks, food and  music, will lead audiences throughout this theatrical first, promised to be 'a darkly  atmospheric journey of trans-cultural discovery . . .’    


IAIN BLOOMFIELD   ARTISTIC DIRECTOR, THEATRE IN THE MILL    ‘Raining Old Women and Sticks’ attempts to explore commonality through difference. This  play is home-grown, inspired by the many cultures who live in Bradford and the  perceptions the outside world has of this city, it explores what we mean when we use the  term “British”.      This play challenges us, looking at what both divides and unites communities, 'Raining Old  Women and Sticks' dares to engage with political realities and explores possible futures.  The play raises many questions; What does it mean to be non white and English? Does a  sense of Britishness exist?  Historically the Britain has always been a multi languaged  Island, “Raining Old Women and Sticks” delves into language as a cultural reference point  and asks: if certain words are untranslatable from one language to another, are thoughts?  And if we lose our mother tongue do we also lose a way of thinking?”    Throughout the making of this play, it is has been clear from our actors, writers and  directors  - of Welsh and British Asian origin - how language and culture are central to a  sense of identity, and this place in which we live has always been a multi-cultural/multilanguage environment.     An audience may not understand every word spoken but they will understand and identify  every action and emotion.  In this lies a truth.  That which divides us - ethnicity, colour,  language, religion, politics is quickly and easily apparent but it only take the shortest of  looks beyond that and our common bonds of humanity are clear and overwhelming.    IAN ROWLANDS   ARTISTIC DIRECTOR, NORTH WALES STAGE     There is a tendency by some Welsh people to be narrow-minded about race. However  within the devolved Britain of today, we’re not the only minority fighting for its identity. We  should therefore put aside old prejudices and initiate dialogues with all the peoples of  these Islands in order to develop a deeper and more meaningful understanding of each  other.  

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